London is a great city but it should be better.



I'm running to be the Labour candidate for Mayor of London because I want to build One London - where we all share in our city's success.

London needs a Labour Mayor – our city is too unequal, the housing crisis is out of control, and the Tories won’t lift a finger.

But just imagine what we can do if we win in May. More homes, better transport, real opportunity for everyone.

I can beat the Tories, and from Sure Start to the Olympics Londoners know I can deliver.

I believe I’ve got the plan to bind our city back together and unleash every Londoners' full potential. I've got the support across our city to win, and the record to do the job – but I can’t do it without your support.












My Story
I was born a Londoner.

I love London. I was born here, my children were born here, I’ve worked here all my life. This is a unique city, with an energy like nowhere else in the world.

I’m so proud of London, but I know that too many Londoners don’t share in our city’s success.

I’ve been a childcare officer in Brixton, working with decent families in tremendous poverty. I was a psychiatric social worker in Southwark, helping those who need extra support to get on in life. I’ve seen the true impact of the inequality that holds our city back.

I’ve always fought to build a better, fairer society. That’s what politics is about. It’s not about soaring speeches, and nice sound bites, it’s about delivery – actually making things better, whatever obstacles are put in your way. I’ve always tried to remember that.

As a councillor in Camden I fought for equal pay when people said it was a waste of time – but we won.

As an MP in Dulwich and West Norwood I fought for and won new schools for our community when others said we should settle for what we've got.

As a cabinet Minister I worked with David Blunkett to establish Sure Start – which has helped 100,000s of young Londoners children get a better start in life.







And in 2002 I was the Secretary of State who took the decision to bid for the Olympics in London. It wasn’t easy. Everyone was sceptical. First the department tried to talk me out of it. But I won them over.

Then the Prime Minister said he wasn’t convinced. But I talked him round. Then I convinced the cabinet.

Then – when everyone told us Paris had it in the bag - I got on a plane with the rest of the bid team and we talked the world round as well.

And we delivered the greatest Games the world has ever seen – and London was the star of the show.

The Gamesmakers, the atmosphere in our city, that sense that our home is truly the best place on earth. We all felt it.

The Olympics were a success because we had the best people doing their best work for a great cause. We need to bring that same sense to building One London today.

Every day I see another reason why I want to be the Mayor of London – another example of the things I want to change. The Housing crisis, the inequality that threatens to tear our city apart, the searing lack of opportunity that robs so many young Londoners of their potential…. So it all comes down to this.

I believe I can deliver the change that London needs.

I've always fought for Londoners, I've delivered for London before and I want to fight for the people of this city again.










My plan to build One London where we all share in our city’s success

Building the homes we need, affordable transport you can rely on, unleashing our city’s potential, real opportunity for all Londoners.


On Day One of my mayoralty, I will establish
Homes for Londoners



We need urgent action to tackle London’s housing crisis. As Mayor of London, I will make housing my number one priority - to finally get a grip of the housing crisis and get our city building the homes we need.


Visit Homes for Londoners now

Better transport


London’s transport is failing to keep pace with the dynamism of our city. If we are to build one London, we need better, more affordable transport which meets the huge population growth and housing pressures we face and guarantees the future prosperity we all rely on.

As Mayor, I will freeze fares for the first year, to release Londoners from the endless spiral of fare hikes. I will introduce one zone weekends, so all Londoners can enjoy everything the city has to offer. And I’ll end the two bus rip-off with one-hour tickets, to deliver real savings for people who have to change buses.



After housing, fares are one of the biggest costs most families face. Over recent years, the mayor has piled on the pressure, repeatedly increasing bus and tube fares by more than prices at just the moment when wages have stagnated. At the same time, commuters travelling into work by train have been hit by huge hikes in ticket prices. For all Londoners, but particularly those on low pay, there’s nothing fair about rising fares.

Soaring travel costs are not, though, simply a threat to family budgets. They also endanger London’s competitiveness. People pay more to travel to work in London than they do in other cities, not just in the UK but throughout Europe. And to ensure that London is the best city in the world to live, work and to do business, we have to address the gaps in connectivity and capacity which result from decades of under-investment. Rail travel in London and the south-east has grown by 60 per cent over the past two decades, while capacity has increased by only about 25 per cent. Transport for London forecasts 650,000 more rail trips per day into and around London by 2025.


Crossrail will allow us to start addressing these problems but, alone, it is insufficient. TfL estimates that Crossrail will add about 10 per cent to London’s transport capacity, but population growth in London is set to out-strip that. As London’s transport commissioner recognises, when Crossrail opens in three year’s time “it will immediately be full”.

It took six decades for Crossrail to get the green light. London cannot wait that long again for the next major high-capacity rail project. It is also an entirely false economy: it is estimated that, over time, the benefits to the country as a whole of Crossrail in terms of increased productivity, jobs and reduced journey times will be more than twice what it has cost to build.

We have to take action now to address this looming capacity crisis: one which threatens to make the morning and evening commute more and more unpleasant and will eventually cost London investment, jobs and opportunities as businesses decide they’ll set up in those cities which offer a 21st century transport infrastructure.


Air Quality


London’s air quality is among the worst in Europe. We rank below cities such as Berlin, Amsterdam and Paris, and – internationally – our air is more polluted than cities such as Los Angeles, Chicago and Sydney. Central London in particular regularly breaches the legal limits for air pollution.

As Mayor, I will;

  • Pedestrianise Oxford Street in order to clean up London's air, as a first step to making London a walking city
  • Aim to commission only zero-emission capable buses from 2020
  • Encourage the development of a leasing scheme to help taxi drivers make the jump to zero-emission capable cabs
  • Ensure that plans to extend London Charging infrastructure and establish a Paris-style car club are delivered by 2018
  • Have air pollution monitors installed at ‘buggy level’ to help parents understand the effect of poor air quality




Air quality is not just an environment issue, it is a public health emergency. Pollution is a silent killer: London's Clean Air campaign estimates that almost 7,500 deaths in London each year can be attributed to air-quality related illnesses; in some parts of the capital one in 12 deaths are partly caused by the effects of particle air pollution.

Our children and elderly bear the brunt of the pollution with our cars choke London’s air. I find deeply disturbing the thought of mums pushing buggies near the North Circular Road knowing their babies are inhaling the most toxic fumes in London. Or that a child’s walk to school is putting their health in serious danger.
Over 1,000 London schools are within 150 metres of roads on which 10,000 or more vehicles travel each day – putting our children and young people at risk of developing asthma, with evidence also suggesting stunted lung growth.

At the same time, high pollution levels increase the chance that London’s elderly people will suffer life-threatening cardiovascular diseases.

I will ensure that TfL leads by example putting London's buses, taxis and car clubs on the path to all-electric technology.







Connecting London

A One London transport policy will also address London’s connectivity challenge. South London has a patchwork of unintegrated, underdeveloped and poorly managed local and suburban main line rail services. Its 227 stations, many of them bleak and untouched for a century, symbolise the second-class service south Londoners get – as their commute plays second fiddle to the demands of the long-distance rail firms. This is a key part of the north-south divide my One London transport plan will overcome.

As well as closing the north-south side divide, my One London transport plan will also close the Thames chasm. London is moving east: Tower Hamlets, Newham, Barking and Dagenham and Havering on the north bank, Southwark, Lewisham, Greenwich and Bexley on the south, are projected to provide nearly half of London’s new housing over the coming decades.

But east of Tower Bridge, cars, bikes, buses and trucks have to battle the daily bottlenecks around the Blackwall and Rotherhithe tunnels, while the North Greenwich cable car carries fewer passengers in a week than a bridge or tunnel would carry in 10 minutes. Sadly, in cancelling the Greenwich to Newham bridge on taking office in 2008, the mayor has simply compounded this massive obstacle to growth and prosperity in London.

I understand why many Londoners choose to own a car. But much of London is a car park: its roads are clogged, but most cars sit idle most of the time – 14 per cent of the city’s real estate is occupied by parked cars. Many Londoners want an alternative: the mobility a car provides without the hassle and cost of owning one.

Cycling

More and more Londoners are cycling – but cycling in London is still far too risky. I want to champion cycling safety so that more people in London, particularly women and older people, have the confidence to cycle.

Cycling is win-win – good for health, reduces congestion on buses tubes and roads, and reduces air pollution. We should be doing everything we can to ensure this is a welcoming city for cyclists.

London today is not truly fit for cyclists – and lives are being put at risk.

If I am Mayor, I will:

  • Use the convening power of the Mayor to ensure that all primary and secondary schools offer cycling proficiency courses called ‘bikeability’ – and promote cycling proficiency courses among adults
  • Accelerate the completion of the Better Junctions programme – with all 33 junctions to be completed before 2020
  • Ensure that all HGVs become ‘cyclist-safe,’ with driver vision cabs that improve visibility and eliminate blind spots.
  • Ensure that the Metropolitan Police enforce 20 mph roads where they have been designated by TfL and the boroughs
  • Continue with the proposed work to create an all-London cycling network
  • Let’s make London a city fit for cyclists, fit for Londoners and fit for a healthy future.








Opportunity for all


I want to build One London – where we all share in our city’s success. But today, too many Londoners feel like the opportunity in our city isn’t for them.

For many children and young people, London is the greatest city in the world to grow up. It is a city of huge opportunities and excitement; the best schools in the country; and real cultural vibrancy. But these experiences are not ones shared by all of London’s children and young people. This damaging divide tears at the social fabric of our city entrenching inequality for generations to come.

Despite being the nation’s richest region, London has some of the highest rates of child poverty in Britain. Nearly 4 in 10 of London’s children grow up in poverty. In some boroughs, that figure reaches close to 50 per cent. But, underlining the gulf in wealth and opportunity in our city, that figure is two-thirds lower in the capital’s most prosperous boroughs.

And too many Londoners work hard but don’t receive a fair day’s pay for a hard day’s work. That has to change. Everyone should have the opportunity to enjoy the best of London.

Restoring Sure Start - giving every child, every chance



I’ll restore Sure Start to its founding principles – and make this promise to Londoners: we’ll make sure every child, has every chance. That’s what building One London is all about.


Read my plan for Sure Start

Fair Pay



London is home to more billionaires than any other city on earth, and yet last year – thanks to low pay, delays and cuts in benefits, sickness and debt – nearly 100,000 Londoners were forced to use a foodbank.


My plan to end poverty pay

Helping young Londoners into
a decent job



London is failing to provide our young people with the experience and skills both they and our businesses need to succeed in the global economy.


My plan for young Londoners

10 things to do before you’re 10



My promise to London children – every child should be able to enjoy the rich experience of childhood beyond school.


Find out more

#TeamTessa
Join the movement for
One London

Become part of our team changing London.
Get involved and let us know why you're on #TeamTessa.







Alan

“I'm on Team Tessa because she has the energy, the ideas, the enthusiasm and the intelligence to unite London and make it an even better place to live and work in.”

Sarah

“I’m on #TeamTessa because she has the appeal and the record to win!”

Juliana

“Tessa was my MP for most of my life and I know she can deliver for London as she’s done for the Olympics – and she was very supportive for young people and carried them along with her!”

Mark

“I’m backing Tessa because we need to build more homes for Londoners & she’s the candidate who’s already proven she can deliver”



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1.5 million Londoners voted Labour in May, yet the vast majority of those have no democratic voice in this selection. We want to change that. We want as many Londoners as possible to have their voices heard during this campaign.

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